Tagged: New York

NYSDEC Adopts Update to SEQR Regulations

NYSDEC Adopts Update to SEQR Regulations

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (“DEC”) announced on June 28, 2018 that it had adopted a rulemaking package directed at updating its regulations relating to the State Environmental Quality Review (“SEQR”). The updates – DEC’s first to its SEQR regulations in more than two decades – are the product of an effort that began in February 2017 with the DEC’s filing of an initial notice and, following a series of public comment periods and subsequent revisions, culminated with its publication of the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (“FGEIS”) and revised text of the regulations. As revised, the regulations become effective on January 1, 2019 and apply to all actions for which a determination of significance has not been made by January 1, 2019. For projects that receive a determination of significance made prior to January 1, 2019, the existing SEQR regulations (which originally took effect in 1996) will continue to apply. Once effective, the revised regulations could have a significant impact on SEQR’s applicability to future development projects. The new regulations contemplate a number of mechanical changes to the environmental review process itself, including mandatory scoping of environmental impact statements, changes to the required content of environmental impact...

Real Estate and Pass-Through Provisions of the New Tax Act

Real Estate and Pass-Through Provisions of the New Tax Act

The new Tax Act was signed into law on December 22, 2017. Holders and developers of commercial real estate will be impacted by certain provisions of the new Tax Act, such as its treatment of real property depreciation deductions, 1031 like-kind exchanges, and pass-through rates. We direct you to our recent Legislative Tax Alert for a more detailed overview of certain relevant provisions of the new Tax Act. If you have questions or concerns about how the new Tax Act will impact you or your business, please contact Russell B. Bershad, a Director in the Gibbons Real Property Department, or Peter J. Ulrich, a Director in the Gibbons Corporate Department. Andrew J. Camelotto is an Associate in the Gibbons Real Property Department.

Opinion from Eastern District of New York May Have Opened the Door to a New Defense for Potential CERCLA “Arrangers”

Opinion from Eastern District of New York May Have Opened the Door to a New Defense for Potential CERCLA “Arrangers”

In Town of Islip v. Datre, a recent decision out of the Eastern District of New York, the court adopted an approach to “arranger liability” under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (“CERCLA”) that holds parties cannot be liable unless they knew that the substances they arranged for disposal were, in fact, hazardous. The Islip court’s approach represents a departure from traditional considerations of arranger liability and, if followed by future courts, may present a defense for potentially responsible parties who, though intentionally arranging for disposal of materials which ultimately lead to contamination, lacked specific knowledge that such materials contained hazardous substances. The Islip case arises out of illegal dumping of hazardous construction and demolition debris that occurred at a public park (“the park”) in Islip, New York between 2013 and 2014. Though the case involves an elaborate and bizarre dumping scheme involving, among many others, a local church, the parks department, and a number of haulers, as well as the eventual filing of criminal charges, it is sufficient for present purposes to distill the facts as follows. Relevant to the issue of arranger liability, a civil complaint filed by the Town of Islip (“the Town”) alleged that...

NYSDEC Announces Proposed Amendments to SEQRA Regulations

NYSDEC Announces Proposed Amendments to SEQRA Regulations

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) recently announced proposed amendments to the regulations implementing the State Environmental Quality Review Act (“SEQRA”), 6 N.Y.C.R.R. Part 617. The amendments mark the first update to the SEQRA regulations in over 20 years. According to a press release issued by the NYSDEC, “[t]he update is designed to encourage smart growth and sustainable development across the state” and is intended to compliment the agency’s implementation of the New York State Lean Initiative, which the NYSDEC says has “improved public responsiveness and performance at DEC while maintaining high standards of environmental and natural resource protection.” The press release explains that “[t]he proposed amendments to SEQR will both streamline and strengthen the State’s environmental review process by expanding the actions not subject to further review, known as Type II actions, modifying certain thresholds for actions deemed more likely to require the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS), making scoping of an EIS mandatory rather than optional, and making the acceptance procedures for a draft EIS more consistent.” Examples of proposed Type II actions that would be added to the SEQR regulations include: installation of broadband within an existing right-of-way; green infrastructure upgrades or...

New York DEC Finalizes Definition of “Underutilized” Under Brownfield Cleanup Act Amendments 0

New York DEC Finalizes Definition of “Underutilized” Under Brownfield Cleanup Act Amendments

On July 29, 2016, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (“DEC”) announced that it had finalized the definition of “underutilized” for purposes of the 2015 Brownfield Cleanup Act Amendments and eligibility for redevelopment tax credits. The final rule closely tracks DEC’s March 9, 2016 proposed definition, which attracted numerous comments, mostly adverse, from members of the public and the regulated community.

Proposed Definition of “Underutilized” for Brownfield Cleanup Act Amendments Draws Many Comments 0

Proposed Definition of “Underutilized” for Brownfield Cleanup Act Amendments Draws Many Comments

Numerous organizations and individuals have submitted comments on the proposed definition of “underutilized” published by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) on March 9, 2016, pursuant to the 2015 Brownfield Cleanup Act Amendments. The Amendments require NYSDEC to propose a definition for “underutilized,” one of the few remaining ways for New York City sites to qualify for tangible property tax credits under the State’s Brownfield Cleanup Program (BCP). As such, this definition is seen by many as crucial to the continued viability of the BCP as a cleanup mechanism for brownfield properties in New York City.

NYSDEC Proposes New Definition of “Underutilized” for Tangible Property Tax Credits at New York City Brownfield Sites 0

NYSDEC Proposes New Definition of “Underutilized” for Tangible Property Tax Credits at New York City Brownfield Sites

On March 9, 2016, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) proposed a new definition of an “underutilized” site for purposes of claiming tangible property tax credits for sites in New York City under the New York State Brownfield Cleanup Program (BCP). As noted in prior blogs, the 2015 amendments to the BCP established new restrictions on the ability of sites in the five boroughs of New York City to obtain tax credits related to expenditures for site improvements. One of the criteria which would allow a site to qualify for such credits was that the site be “underutilized.” That term was left undefined by the Legislature, with instructions to NYSDEC to finalize a definition by October 1, 2015.

Gibbons Director David Freeman Featured in The New York Environmental Lawyer 0

Gibbons Director David Freeman Featured in The New York Environmental Lawyer

David J. Freeman, a Director in the Gibbons Real Property & Environmental Department, was recently profiled in the Fall/Winter 2015 edition of The New York Environmental Lawyer for his achievements as a longstanding member of the Environmental Law Section of the New York State Bar Association. A member of the Section for more than 30 years, Mr. Freeman serves as Co-Chair of both the Committee on Hazardous Waste/Site Remediation and the Section’s Brownfields Task Force. The Task Force played an important role in the passage of the State’s Brownfield Cleanup Act in 2003 and the amendments enacted in 2008 and 2015, and in monitoring and commenting on the implementation of the Act by the Department of Environmental Conservation. Mr. Freeman received the Section’s Distinguished Service Award in 2001.

New Year’s Eve All Night Alcoholic Beverage Permit Application Deadline Approaching in New York 0

New Year’s Eve All Night Alcoholic Beverage Permit Application Deadline Approaching in New York

The New York State Liquor Authority (SLA) has announced on its webpage that the submission deadline for New Year’s Eve All Night Permit Applications is November 16, 2015. The SLA has outlined the criteria that will be considered in deciding whether to issue such permits. They include: timely filing of the application; licensee’s disciplinary history (including any pending charges); and whether, given the nature of the event, the licensee has adequate facilities and security plans in place.

NYSDEC Hears Comments on Proposed Definition of “Underutilized” 0

NYSDEC Hears Comments on Proposed Definition of “Underutilized”

On July 29, 2015, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) conducted a public hearing on its proposed definition of an “underutilized” site for purposes of the 2015 Brownfield Cleanup Act Amendments. As indicated in a prior blog, this definition is critical because being “underutilized” is one of the few ways that a New York City brownfield site can qualify for tangible property credits under the 2015 Amendments.